The Horse and His Boy

The Horse and His Boy

Book - 1994 | 1st HarperCollins ed
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A boy and a talking horse share an adventurous and dangerous journey to Narnia to warn of invading barbarians.
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins, 1994
Edition: 1st HarperCollins ed
ISBN: 9780060234881
9780064471060
Branch Call Number: JUV FIC Lew
Characteristics: 224 p. : ill. map ; 24 cm
Additional Contributors: Baynes, Pauline

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r
Reader_227
Apr 15, 2021

An intresting installment of the Narnia series; More of a filler, but still has a decent storyline.

f
Foreverhope
Mar 02, 2021

“The Horse and His Boy,” is the third installment of “The Chronicles of Narnia,” where a young boy named, Shasta and his newfound horse friend, Bree try to escape from their world to Narnia. But no journey would not be one without numerous obstacles along the way.

During certain chapters, it was a bit slow, but I do give credit for diving right into the journey at the beginning of the novel. This allowed the story to start off fast-paced, but still be able to give background information about the characters without that taking away from the story.

I absolutely enjoyed the humor that was present throughout the novel, as well. Aravis’, a girl who is also traveling to Narnia with her horse Hwin, and Shasta’s relationship consisted of many silent treatments and constant banter. Yet, their horses who ended up being second cousins once removed got along splendidly!

At the end of “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe,” the P children are shown as the kings and queens of Narnia before they returned back home through the wardrobe. In this book, we see Edmund, Susan, and Lucy led a war and other trials that I won’t spoil. Nonetheless, it was neat “seeing” (so to speak) them as leaders in their respective roles and the mentions of Peter’s accomplishments as the High King.

All-in-all, I’d rate “The Horse and His Boy” 4 ½ stars and would encourage someone to trudge through the slower moments. Why? Because the end brings quite surprise.

t
The_Zookeeper
Nov 25, 2020

So far, of the Narnia books I've listened to, this was my favorite. It felt like it could be read standalone and I really liked the characters. If this had not been part of the Narnia series, I still feel like I would have read it because of it's plot, whereas I wouldn't have with The Magician's Nephew. Now, onward to Prince Caspian.

bibliosara Feb 15, 2020

An enjoyable juvenile fantasy that holds bits of wisdom for all ages, The Horse and His Boy tells the story of four runaways (two being Talking Horses) as they make their way from the harsh desert land of the Calormenes to the wilds of free Narnia and Archenland. Along the way, they make some unexpected allies and are matured by terrifying experiences. Their journey is complicated by a nefarious prince and a look-alike. In addition, some familiar faces from The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe reappear. Lewis expertly handles the fantastical setting while fully developing each character. Our heroes encounter friendship, grow in courage, and are taught wisdom by their folly in this wonderful classic piece of fiction.

l
LaNomada01
Dec 27, 2018

Number 5 in the "Chronicles of Narnia" series, this book is by far my favorite. Because it's about beating the odds, proving you know your own worth even when others don't believe, and doing what's right even when it means you have to go against something much stronger.

t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Aug 14, 2018

The Horse and His Boy seems to take a spin on what we all know as reality. But that is Narnia. For one, in this book, C.S. Lewis changed up the characters. Instead of the four children, it now shows two different children. They are both from a once wonderful place, but one that is now plagued with humans. One is a servant child, who is close to getting sold. Another is a princess, who is about to get married to a man that is several years older than her. Both run away on horses, and soon realize that the horses are actually from Narnia, where all animals speak. Although the boy and girl continue to be continuously annoyed with one another, they eventually put aside their differences. They work together to save Narnia once again. The story ends with the boy and girl getting married, and owning a castle. Although this book does not seem to match with the rest of the series, C.S. Lewis has done a great job spinning a new tale from an old one. Rating: 4/5
- @thesoundofcolours of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

a
aaansari
Jul 18, 2017

A boy who runs away from his foster father when the father wants to sell him to an arrogant Tarkhan. A horse that belongs to the Tarkhan (the horse can talk). A pround Tarkheena, (a female version of a Tarkhan). The Tarkheena's gentle horse.
Shasta, Bree, Aravis and Hwin come together through the lion, Aslan. This book is wonderfully put together with adventure around every corner. You can't wait to see what happens next.

t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Mar 17, 2017

The book The Horse and His Boy, by C. S. Lewis, is a great book and often overlooked in the Narnia series. It takes place while the Pevensie children rule Narnia in a neighboring land. A talking horse and an adopted boy about to be sold run away together, their destination being Narnia. I like almost all of the book. I just don't really like the ending. It just didn't work for me. Other than that it was great! I love the part of the story where they are trying to get through the capital! (4 out of 5 stars)
- @Redibis of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

The Horse and His Boy is the third book in The Chronicles of Narnia. This book is taken place during the Golden Age of Narnia where we get to follow along with Shasta as he runs away from home after finding out that Arsheesh was not his real father. Along the way Shasta meets a girl who is also running away from home, and together they trying to find their way to Narnia. I found it very interesting how we got to learn about these new characters, learn about their backgrounds, and see how they all connect with the story. I really enjoyed learning about these new characters (especially Shasta, and learning how it fits in with Narnia, and with the other characters that were mentioned in previous books) and following the characters in their adventure to Narnia. Overall, I really enjoyed the book, and am excited to read the next book in this series. Rating 4/5.
- @novelidea of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

The title of the book is literally what the story is about. Blandly, it is about a horse and a boy. I just noticed that all of C.S Lewis' titles are like this: direct with no twist or trick. However, it lets you ponder about what is under the surface/not mentioned. For example, the horse is actually from Narnia and can talk. I'm betting that most people could have guessed the first part but maybe not the second. The boy is actually a slave who wants to be free but needs help. When the two are thrown together, guess what happens? Well, read to find out about their journey! I liked the link from the second book... it was pretty obvious but still great. 3/5 stars
- @Siri of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

There was a boy named Shasta who is an orphan and was left in a wooden boat when one day a man came and adopted him as a slave. He did not like his adoptive father at all. One day, his father was busy talking with another man about selling Shasta to him as a slave. Shasta did not want to be working for another person so he had the intention to leave. Before he left, a horse tied up to a pole spoke out to him. He spoke the human language and told Shasta to escape on him. The horse's name was Bree and he was from a mystical land called Narnia. Narnia is a place where animals and other types of creatures actually speak the human language. The leader of that land is called Aslan. So Shasta and Bree escape without anyone noticing towards Narnia and interact with people who become their friends and share special bonds. This adventure is one that Shasta will never forget.
- @redninam of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

m
mchelli
Dec 10, 2016

There was a boy named Shasta who is an orphan and was left in a wooden boat when one day a man came and adopted him as a slave. He did not like his adoptive father at all. One day, his father was busy talking with another man about selling Shasta to him as a slave. Shasta did not want to be working for another person so he had the intention to leave. Before he left, a horse tied up to a pole spoke out to him. He spoke the human language and told Shasta to escape on him. The horse's name was Bree and he was from a mystical land called Narnia. Narnia is a place where animals and other types of creatures actually speak the human language. The leader of that land is called Aslan. So Shasta and Bree escape without anyone noticing towards Narnia and interact with people who become their friends and share special bonds. This adventure is one that Shasta will never forget.

c
chih2
Sep 19, 2016

fiction

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Quotes

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a
ace124
Aug 21, 2018

"In that case Hwin isn't your horse any longer. One might just as well say you're her human."

w
WijayaG
Aug 25, 2015

'The two boys were looking into each other's faces and suddenly found that they were friends."

m
miketheboy89
Mar 25, 2013

"For Narnia...And the North!"

SAPPHIREBEAR15 Jun 23, 2012

“all worlds draw to an end and that noble death is a treasure which no one is too poor to buy.”

SAPPHIREBEAR15 Jun 23, 2012

“When the police arrived and found no lion, no broken wall, and no convicts, and the Head behaving like a lunatic, there was an inquiry into the whole thing. And in the inquiry all sorts of things about Experiment House came out, and about ten people got expelled. After that, the Head's friends saw that the Head was no use as a Head, so they got her made an Inspector to interfere with other Heads. And when they found she wasn't much good even at that, they got her into Parliament where she lived happily ever after.”

SAPPHIREBEAR15 Jun 23, 2012

“But very quickly they all became grave again: for, as you know, there is a kind of happiness and wonder that makes you serious. It is too good to waste on jokes.”

SAPPHIREBEAR15 Jun 23, 2012

“A dragon has just flown over the tree-tops and lighted on the beach. Yes, I am afraid it is between us and the ship. And arrows are no use against dragons. And they're not at all afraid of fire."

SAPPHIREBEAR15 Jun 23, 2012

“There is a kind of happiness and wonder that makes you serious. It is too good to waste on jokes.”

SAPPHIREBEAR15 Jun 23, 2012

“To the glistening eastern sea, I give you Queen Lucy the Valiant. To the great western woods, King Edmund the Just. To the radiant southern sun, Queen Susan the Gentle. And to the clear northern skies, I give you King Peter the Magnificent. Once a king or queen of Narnia, always a king or queen of Narnia. May your wisdom grace us until the stars rain down from the heavens.”

SAPPHIREBEAR15 Jun 23, 2012

“But courage, child: we are all between the paws of the true Aslan.”

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Age Suitability

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red_hummingbird_173 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and under

g
green_sheep_16
Dec 19, 2015

green_sheep_16 thinks this title is suitable for 6 years and over

k
karatemaster
Nov 09, 2015

karatemaster thinks this title is suitable for 9 years and over

p
PieSkofferrr
Jun 25, 2014

PieSkofferrr thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 8 and 99

w
White_Horse_36
Aug 28, 2013

White_Horse_36 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 6 and 17

indigo_penguin_55 Aug 03, 2012

indigo_penguin_55 thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and under

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Olive_Dog_7
Apr 11, 2011

Olive_Dog_7 thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

k
Keep_On_Rockin
Dec 19, 2010

Keep_On_Rockin thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

VeganGreen Aug 21, 2009

VeganGreen thinks this title is suitable for 9 years and over

Summary

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j
JFhuang
Jul 30, 2014

Shasta is a boy slave working with a horse, Bree. They want to escape this area to warn the king of Narnia about an attack by a nearby kingdom. Nut how do they get there? Food? Shelter?

SAPPHIREBEAR15 Jun 23, 2012

Begun in March and completed at the end of July 1950,[15] The Horse and His Boy was published on 6 September 1954. The story takes place during the reign of the Pevensies in Narnia, an era which begins and ends in the last chapter of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. A talking horse called Bree and a young boy named Shasta, both of whom are in bondage in the country of Calormen, are the protagonists. By chance, they meet and plan their return to Narnia and freedom. Along the way they meet Aravis and her talking horse Hwin who are also fleeing to Narnia.

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